BoLS Lounge : Wargames, Warhammer & Miniatures Forum
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 22
  1. #11

    Default

    Wot he said

    And don't be afraid to experiment.

    There's hundreds of painting tutorials online, covering hundreds of different techniques and effects. Some are really superb, others not so much (too much yapping, overly technical explanations).

    For me? There's but four things you need to get to a decent tabletop standard.

    1. Even undercoaf. Spray cans are your friend here!
    2. Neatly applied base coat colours.
    3. Washes and a suitable brush for applying (right tool, right job)
    4. Some skill in drybrushing - a technique which whilst really quite simple, take a little practice to get just right.

    GW's painting video are good - they move at a reasonable pace, making them easier to follow. The lighting and camera angles are likewise good for seeing exactly what they're doing, how and where.

    And the top secret fifth tip?

    Patience. Very, very few of us go from NooB to Golden Demon in no time. Put advanced techniques on the back burner, and take your time getting your confidence up on the basics
    Fed up for Scalpers? https://www.facebook.com/groups/1710575492567307/?ref=bookmarks

  2. #12
    First-Captain
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    The North, UK
    Posts
    1,630

    Default

    One tip I can give from looking at your model is to either:
    a. take your time and let each colour dry before moving on to the next one
    or
    b. get a cheap hairdryer to speed up the time each colour takes to dry

  3. #13

    Default

    Thanks for the tips!! And keep them coming! Dry brushing is definitely harder than it looks like in the tutorials. I found that one trick to getting cleaner base coats is to pre plan the colors so that the layers can be applied in sequence... I was all over the place painting these and I think that's why there aren't clean lines. And I didn't realize I wasn't waiting long enough to let them dry!

    How long do you have to wait between colors??? I'm color blind so it's hard for me to tell when colors are blending if they are still wet... :// definitely will start adding some patience to the process though! I think I got a little over ambitious to paint the first one! Haha

  4. #14

    Default

    Sadly, blending is something I've never quite got my noggin round.

    However, after lots of trial and error and the odd tantrum, my best results have come from not actually blending the paints together... Instead, get your paint really watery - consistency of full fat milk, and do one layer. Once dry, do another layer, leaving some of the first. The change in translucency might be the very dab you need

    But, that's quite an advanced technique if you ask me, even if it's only because it took me yonks to be so much as acceptable at it!
    Fed up for Scalpers? https://www.facebook.com/groups/1710575492567307/?ref=bookmarks

  5. #15

    Default

    Wet blending is a trick. If you want to make it 'easier' (if that is possible) sneak a little Vallejo thinner and Vallejo Slow Dry into each of the two colors you are working with. I usually go with one really bright and one deep in the same color family. Paint a little of the bright on the edge you want glowing and add the dark to the opposite side bringing it up against the bright. Now use your brush to mix the two along the line they share gradually pulling more bright or dark into the mix as needed. It is fiddly and takes a few attempts but once you get the feel for it it can give you some nice effects. Although it tends to take a lot of time to paint models this way.

    Make sure your blended area has time to dry before you add and bright edge highlight or deep shadow color... the retarder can add 10-20 minutes to the drying time depending on temp and humidity.

    Sir Mystery's method works well too and I have used it successfully when doing some non-metallic metal. Another weird advanced thing to play with if it ever suits your fancy. Object Source Lighting is another one of the more advanced concepts that I'm still toying with. So many things to try out and learn as you get comfortable with your basic technique.
    My Truescale Insanity
    http://www.lounge.belloflostsouls.net/showthread.php?48704-Truescale-Space-Wolves

  6. #16

    Default

    Yup. All about taking your time and building up your confidence.

    When it comes to trying out new techniques, have a hunt around on your leftover sprues for sacrificial bitz. Better to practice on those, than risk mucking up a model with an otherwise prized paint job

    For example? I'm currently painting my Ad Mech army for 40k. And I've started with my Knights, on account they're quite easy to do, and eat up my points.

    But the next unit I'm doing are my Kastellan Robots - for these, I'll be experimenting with my new airbrush, and Tamiya's clear colours (other brands are available!). But I don't much fancy starting on those.

    So I'll be diving into my bitz box for suitable relics from the past. Once dug out, whatever the model is will be my first foray into airbrushing - but not being part of my army, I'm happy to bodge it in the name of science (FOR SCIENCE!). Hopefully, it won't take me long to get that down - only thing I need to work out on the airbrush itself is how to lower its spray psi...
    Fed up for Scalpers? https://www.facebook.com/groups/1710575492567307/?ref=bookmarks

  7. #17

    Default

    Very good first attempt. Just keep practicing and try looking up techniques. (I.E. Glazes, Washes, Blending, Layering, Feathering, etc.)

    Also thinning your paints is something that important and will help create smooth surfaces when used correctly. It takes time to get an idea of how to do this well however.

  8. #18

    Default

    Oh, and treat your brushes right!

    Probably the most underrated advice is to look after your brushes. When I'm painting, I want the paint no more than halfway up the bristles, and ideally just sitting on the top, rather than penetrating all the way through.

    If you get paint all over them, it'll dry in between them where the bristles meet the handle. This forces the bristles to splay, and eventually knackers your brush before its time.

    And for drybrushing, get a dedicated drybrush - if you use regular ones, that also knackers them!
    Fed up for Scalpers? https://www.facebook.com/groups/1710575492567307/?ref=bookmarks

  9. #19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Mystery View Post
    Oh, and treat your brushes right!

    Probably the most underrated advice is to look after your brushes. When I'm painting, I want the paint no more than halfway up the bristles, and ideally just sitting on the top, rather than penetrating all the way through.

    If you get paint all over them, it'll dry in between them where the bristles meet the handle. This forces the bristles to splay, and eventually knackers your brush before its time.

    And for drybrushing, get a dedicated drybrush - if you use regular ones, that also knackers them!
    Great advice! You absolutely have to look after your brushes! Never dip too deep into the paint... something I took too long to learn myself.
    My Truescale Insanity
    http://www.lounge.belloflostsouls.net/showthread.php?48704-Truescale-Space-Wolves

  10. #20
    Brother-Captain
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Her Majesty's United Kingdom
    Posts
    1,344

    Default

    Oh and get good brushes. Windsor and Newtons aren't much different in price to GW when you get them on Amazon and make controlling the paint much easier.

    A bad workman blames their tools but have for ever met a good crafts person who has poor tools?

    Also have a look at the GW painting guides and YouTube channel they are really helpful these days and get hold of a copy of White Dwarf weekly issue 94 (imaginatively titled The Paint Issue) It has some excellent advice or the various techniques.

    And last but not least use the biggest brush that you can manage for the area you are painting it'll make things much easier to control. Iff course you'll need a brush with a good point
    Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit
    Wisdom is knowing not to put it in a fruit salad.

 

 
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •